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Old 08-10-2010, 04:08 PM   #1
Stephie93
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Unhappy Fondant Failure...

I was going to make a piggy bank for work, and I had it all figured out: I baked the cake, shaped it and crumb-coated it. I decided to cover it in fondant before giving it feet, and I would do the feet separately and hold them on with stakes. However, I'm really bad at working with fondant so I ended up making two sheets to cover it with because of its shape. This looked very bad; you could see the fault line where the two sheets met and it started to crack and dry very quickly. Also, because it was so round I ended up with those extra flaps and I wasn't quite sure what to do with them. anyways, it looked horrible
I finally added feet, and within 3 hours the body had collapsed on the feet, crushing them. Can anyone give me advice on how to work with fondant on round cakes, and how I can salvage this cake?
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Old 08-12-2010, 07:31 PM   #2
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Where is the seam? Could you put a "ribbon" around the middle of the pig that would cover it? (Think like a ribbon tied around a peppermint pig.) AFAIK, there isn't really a good way to repair a fondant seam.

Mostly it's about stretching and molding - and working quickly yet carefully. Have you considered trying something less free-standing like a ladybug or a beetle so that you can get used to the feel of stretching a flat sheet over something rounded?
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Old 08-13-2010, 01:52 PM   #3
bundlesofblessings
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What fondant recipe are you using? Try a marshmellow fondant.

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Old 10-26-2010, 09:42 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephie93 View Post
I was going to make a piggy bank for work, and I had it all figured out: I baked the cake, shaped it and crumb-coated it. I decided to cover it in fondant before giving it feet, and I would do the feet separately and hold them on with stakes. However, I'm really bad at working with fondant so I ended up making two sheets to cover it with because of its shape. This looked very bad; you could see the fault line where the two sheets met and it started to crack and dry very quickly. Also, because it was so round I ended up with those extra flaps and I wasn't quite sure what to do with them. anyways, it looked horrible
I finally added feet, and within 3 hours the body had collapsed on the feet, crushing them. Can anyone give me advice on how to work with fondant on round cakes, and how I can salvage this cake?
There are so many things that could have happened. Did you use a pre-made fondant? Did you use powdered sugar-vs-corn starch? did you develop the gums by kneading the fondant? There a some basic handeling techniques that will insure flawless work. Satin Ice is really simple to use, have you tried it?
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Old 08-31-2011, 03:36 PM   #5
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Satin ice is a really reliable fondant. try it out next time.
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Old 02-15-2014, 05:03 AM   #6
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Steps for fondant:

Step 1

Prepare cake by lightly covering with butter cream icing.



Step 2

Before rolling out fondant, knead it until it is a workable consistency. If fondant is sticky, knead in a little confectioners' sugar. Lightly dust your smooth work surface or the Roll & Cut Mat and your rolling pin with confectioners' sugar to prevent sticking. Roll out fondant sized to your cake. To keep fondant from sticking, lift and move as you roll. Add more confectioners' sugar if needed.






Step 3

Gently lift fondant over rolling pin or slip cake circle under fondant to move; position on cake.






Step 4

Shape fondant to sides of cake with Easy-Glide Smoother. We recommend using the Smoother because the pressure of your hands may leave impressions on the fondant. Beginning in the middle of the cake top, move the Smoother outward and down the sides to smooth and shape fondant to the cake and remove air bubbles. If an air bubble appears, insert a pin on an angle, release air and smooth the area again. Use the straight edge of the Smoother to mark fondant at the base of cake. Trim off excess fondant using a spatula or sharp knife.






Step 5

Your cake is now

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